DD Adams

DD Adams

North Carolina District 05






DD Adams knows North Carolina's 5th Congressional District inside and out.  A lifelong resident of Winston-Salem who has served in the City Council since 2009, she understands the needs and opportunities that exist for the residents of her district.  

DD Adams is a long-time community organizer who has actively registered and mobilized voters across the district. This work allowed her to build a volunteer base that will be critical to her success.

As a former member of the Teamsters, DD knows the advantages that making a living wage with benefits can provide to families of the 5th District, and she has fought to raise the minimum wage in Winston-Salem to $15 per hour and reduce food insecurity for residents.  

Community engagement is the core of a community’s strength. DD has proposed working with community colleges and small businesses to provide more job training and apprenticeship; working with federal, state and local authorities to ensure high quality public education is equitably funded regardless of where a student may live; and increasing community policing and training so police officers are fully integrated into a community. By implementing these strategies, DD sees the potential for all of the residents of her district to thrive not just survive if leadership builds on the strength of the community.

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Paid for by Higher Heights for America PAC. www.HigherHeightsforAmericaPAC.org
Not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.
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